Movies to Watch on World Chocolate Day, July 7

July 7 is World Chocolate Day. Of course, for tens of millions of Americans, every day is Chocolate Day, but at least on July 7 you’ve got the excuse for indulgence. Chocolate and the movies go together in many ways, from the chocolate candies gobbled up by the millions inside movie theaters to the ice cream and tears accompanying sad movies masochistically enjoyed by the heartbroken in the solitude of bedrooms around the country. Chocolate is also featured prominently in the storyline of some movies and here’s a generous sampling to get you started. 

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory 

What other movie could possibly replace “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” as the iconic face of Chocolate Day? Go with the original over the Tim Burton remake and relive the joy of watching poor Augustus pay the price for his sin of chocolately gluttony. The great thing about watching “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” on Chocolate Day is that you can actually eat Willy Wonka brand chocolate products. 

Chocolat 

You can still bring out that tub of chocolate ice cream and enjoy Johnny Depp on Chocolate Day if you want. Rather than Depp as Wonka, enjoy Depp romancing chocolatier Juliette Binoche in one of his rare forays outside the world of weirdness. “Chocolat” gives your favorite candy an even more prominent role in the storyline than Charlie’s visit to Mr. Wonka’s factory. 

Forrest Gump 

You are likely to find few movies that position chocolate as a metaphor more immediately than “Forrest Gump.” Eventually, of course, the metaphorical chocolate becomes a concrete reality, but in the end you will want to add “Forrest Gump” to your marathon of Chocolate Day movies because of the manner in which it transforms the creamy confection into a philosophy of life. 

The Chocolate War 

If “Forrest Gump” is the model for a film that introduces chocolate as a philosophical metaphor, then “The Chocolate War” is the ultimate cinematic treatment of chocolate as allegory. This dark-hued political allegory turns the mundane tradition of raising money by selling chocolate bars into the centerpiece for an examination of ideological control and rebellion against authoritarianism. Chocolate becomes a symbolic stand-in for every product that has set in motion conflict between opposing forces throughout the history of civilization.